why do dogs lick other dogs ears

Why do dogs lick other dogs ears?

Dogs lick other dogs’ ears for a variety of reasons. One of the most common reasons is to show affection. Dogs lick their owners’ ears too, and it’s a sign of love and respect, as is the licking of a dog’s mother’s ears when a puppy. Dogs also lick other dogs’ ears as a way of identifying themselves.When a dog licks another dog’s ears and/or tail, we can get a pretty clear idea of why the dog is doing it: the dog is asserting dominance over that other animal or person.

Usually, dogs lick their own ears because the skin around their canines is so sensitive they can easily overheat in the sun. Also, their sense of smell is far superior to that of humans, so licking other people’s ears can give them a boost of information about other dogs. Dogs also lick other dogs’ ears as a sign of aggression.

Ear latching and licking ia uniques  behavior

Ear latching and licking is a unique behavior in that it has no direct counterpart in other animals. For example, we cats rub our backs while sleeping to help cool us down during the night. So why don’t dogs lick their own backs? I think this one is a bit puzzling. Could it be that licking is a sign of love and respect between humans and dogs, as that’s also the understanding between a pet and its owners?

While licking is a sign of respect and affection between the two species, lapping and sniffing is not. If I pet a baby and he or she licks my hand in return, it is not a sign of love or appreciation. Similarly, lapping and sneezing is not a sign of affection between dogs and humans. If your dog licks your own face, it isn’t a sign of love either.

Ear latching in dogs has been linked to hearing loss in both humans and animals. Sounds with higher frequencies tend to travel faster through the animal’s ears than low frequencies. Therefore, if your dog licks you — or another dog — at any level of audio, it could be a sign of hearing loss.

Why do dogs lick their own ears?

Licking your own ears does not cause as much irritation as you would think. Dogs will lick their ears if they are itchy or have some form of infection.. Dogs will also lick their ears if they have an ear infection.In extreme cases, they lick their ears to remove parasites. You may not see licks on your own dog, but there can be an association between ear licked on by other dogs, and potentially, bacteria from the mouth.

Ear rolls are divided into two categories depending on their purpose. Licking refers to licking the outer skin of the ear. They are the most common form of licking. Common areas include the inner side of the ear canal, top of the head, inner jaw line, or around the edges of the ear. Sometimes, dogs lick on the inside of the ear, or just behind the ear. Other times, they lick anywhere on the head where hair grows.

Skin picking or hair pulling can also cause itching.

Because dogs find hair irritating, it is common to see them licks their own fur or hair from other dogs. This is not a concern to people, however, no furry critters should be allowed to lick your dog’s face or ears.

Wear and tear on the skin of the ear canal is another reason for licks on the ears. The hair pulled by pets can create tiny holes in the ear canal. If you have a dog’s ear canal and it looks worn down, this could be due to the accumulated hair worn away from the skin resulting in a small hole.

Ear licks can also be associated with meningitis, otitis media. This happens when bacteria attach to the ear drum and become thick and black or blue at the back of the ear. Licking your own animal’s ear can bring discomfort or pain, but if the bacteria is small and doesn’t hurt as much as larger infections, it’s unlikely to become a true infection.

 What does ear licking in a dog mean?

Ear licking in dogs is a very common behavior, especially in dogs with long, hairy ears. You’ve probably even seen your dog perform the behavior yourself, so you’re probably wondering why do dogs lick their ears? The answer isn’t entirely clear, but there are a few theories.

Some people believe that licking the skin on their own ears is an expression of affection. Licking the ear hair is how dogs make their home and social mazes easier to navigate, some speculate. Another theory is that lapping from other dogs’ ears is a sign of dominance and pack loyalty. This theory suggests that if you see any subsiding, you should back off and watch the situation until they realize you aren’t interested.

The most popular theory currently is that it has to do with anxiety

The most popular theory currently is that it has to do with anxiety. A dog who licks their own ears because they feel stressed may lick the other dogs’ ears as a way to alleviate their own anxiety. From a medical perspective, licking our own hair is considered an odd behavior, but it doesn’t technically qualify as an anxiety disorder. Dr. Russel DeBakey from the Stanford University School of Medicine explains:

“Even if you were to put your finger in their ear and give them an immediate shock, a dog will lick the hair away without it leaving a mark. The fur will regrow without visual cue in a few days and it won’t be an active fear response. That’s what we mean by use it or lose it.”

Unlike psychiatric disorders, licking your dog’s ears is likely not an indicator of an actual issue. So if you see your dog lapping their ears regularly, it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re suffering from a mental health issue or that they’re missing a sense of loyalty.

 How can you prevent or reduce ear licking in your dog?

Ear mites are a common problem that lots of pet owners have to deal with. Ear mites are tiny parasites that live inside your dog’s ear canals. They feed on the earwax and dead skin cells, and they can cause your dog a lot of discomfort.If your dog comes in contact with any of these dead skin cells, it can make its eartkerchief red, it may itch and cause irritation, and in severe cases, it can cause infection.

Ear licking is not actually  a bad thing by  most people with dogs. In fact, it is a good thing for dogs, since it relieves their itching around the ear and can even make your dog happier. Potential cause: If your dog licks his or her ear, it could be due to a common allergy or a skin irritant, or it could be a symptom of ear infections. See the next section to learn more about popular ear infections that can cause swelling in the ear and scratching in the ears.

Most dogs do not lick their own ears

Most dogs do not lick their own ears, but that doesn’t mean your dog is immune. Any dog that has an ear canal near its mouth may lick its ear, and at certain times of the day the can wander into other areas of your dog’s body. What causes these licks? Ear mites, bacteria, snake bite oil, and earwax.

Ear mites: Ear bug bites can also cause swelling in your dog’s ear and could make the licks become more severe. Ear mites eat the dead skin cells in your dog’s ear canal, and since those cells are dead, the dead skin doesn’t break down and dry as quickly as it would in a clean ear canal. So the mites can stay in your dog’s ear for longer periods of time, causing swelling in your dog’s ear and making unlearned licks in the ear more common.

source : medium

 

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